Titane (2021), Why it’s not Queer, but the Horrific Reversal of a Romantic Comedy

The physical body – its desired appearance, how you care for it, what it needs, the stages it has to go through in life, the pains it should or should not endure, the amount of exercise and sleep it needs – is an expression of social cultural categories, according to anthropologists Marcel Mauss and Mary… Read More Titane (2021), Why it’s not Queer, but the Horrific Reversal of a Romantic Comedy

[Modern Dance] Elenit (2019), Community in a Fantastic Absurd

Elenit, by Euripides Laskaridis // Osmosis, promised architectural modes of light and space, creative costumes, and to be a ‘comedy of the absurd’. This lured me into buying a ticket. It did not disappoint on all these points, but something else happened: I was a lot more touched by this absurd comedy dance theatre than… Read More [Modern Dance] Elenit (2019), Community in a Fantastic Absurd

The Invisible Man (1933) versus (2020), Horrific Changes in Science and Love

The Invisible Man is a science fiction novel from 1897, written by H. G. Wells, and since then it has turned into movies and television shows multiple times, including spin-offs and sequels. What changed between the first and the last movie? Both are tales of a mad scientist, but the same story has sparked different… Read More The Invisible Man (1933) versus (2020), Horrific Changes in Science and Love

Why Psycho’s (1960) psychiatrist scene is more important than you think

Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) follows protagonists like a relay race. We start with Marion, until the iconic shower scene. We take over with Arbogast, until the stairs-shot-from-above scene. We continue with Lila and Sam, until the basement (reveal) scene. And then something strange happens. We find ourselves with a psychiatrist who explains it all to us,… Read More Why Psycho’s (1960) psychiatrist scene is more important than you think

Sartre about Horror, human existence symbolized or an escape?

Sartre describes in his oeuvre emotional responses that could easily be recognized as horrific reactions, the emotions the horror genre wants to evoke. Our sudden irrational fear of an unexpected face against the window (in Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions), Roquentin’s nauseating experience when the entire world seems to collapse from its determined… Read More Sartre about Horror, human existence symbolized or an escape?