Why the Dance Scene in Ex Machina (2015) Is More Philosophical Than You Think

The dance scene in Garland’s Ex Machina is the most interesting scene in the movie and the best portrayal of Hegel’s Master-Slave dialectic in centuries. Definitely the best one on a disco beat. At first sight Ex Machina is about what makes an AI self conscious. Caleb, a young programmer, works for Bluebook (a Google-type… Read More Why the Dance Scene in Ex Machina (2015) Is More Philosophical Than You Think

Why Psycho’s (1960) Psychiatrist Scene is More Important Than You Think

Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) follows protagonists like a relay race. We start with Marion, until the iconic shower scene. We take over with Arbogast, until the stairs-shot-from-above scene. We continue with Lila and Sam, until the basement (reveal) scene. And then something strange happens. We find ourselves with a psychiatrist who explains it all to us,… Read More Why Psycho’s (1960) Psychiatrist Scene is More Important Than You Think

Sartre about Horror, Human Existence Symbolized or an Escape?

Sartre describes in his oeuvre emotional responses that could easily be recognized as horrific reactions, the emotions the horror genre wants to evoke. Our sudden irrational fear of an unexpected face against the window (in Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions), Roquentin’s nauseating experience when the entire world seems to collapse from its determined… Read More Sartre about Horror, Human Existence Symbolized or an Escape?

Blade Runner 2049’s Joi versus Jeanette Winterson about Artificial Love

The most interesting ideas in Blade Runner 2049 are portrayed in the AI character Joi and her relation with male protagonist K. Their relation is not shown as unproblematic. In an early scene K. remarks – while watching an old clip – that Rachael likes Decker, but he is answered coldly that everybody likes to… Read More Blade Runner 2049’s Joi versus Jeanette Winterson about Artificial Love